Rover Rescue Outside Adoptions may be able to help you find a new home for your dog. What is an “outside adoption”? It is a service Rover Rescue offers to help you find your pet a new home. Outside Adoptions provides you with the opportunity to post your dog’s pictures and information on the Internet. The Internet has helped more than 95% of the dogs Rover Rescue has fostered find new homes. Not only will your pet’s information be posted on www.petfinder.com, but also on www.1-800-save-a-pet.com. This also allows you to be an active participant in finding your dog a new home. Who knows your dog better than you?

Potential adopters can preview your dog’s pictures and biography to determine whether he/she might be a good choice for their home. The biography will provide important details about your dog, such as insight into his/her personality, likes and dislikes, activity level, and the reason you need a new home for your dog.

Many potential adopters specifically look for dogs in need of a new home. They would much rather adopt a pet than purchase a dog from a pet store. There are huge benefits for adopting a pet. Typically, the pet has already been neutered/spayed and is current on all vaccinations. Most often, the pet is already housetrained and accustomed to living with a family.

A little effort on your part will go a long way in finding your pet a new home. After all, you did make the commitment to care for your pet the day you became his/her owner. The least you can do is make sure your pet goes to a wonderful new owner who is willing to provide good care and a happy life to your four-footed friend.

Most often, owners who can no longer keep their pet just want to relinquish their responsibilities and turn the dog over to Rover Rescue. Unfortunately, there are many reasons this is not possible. Rover Rescue is not a shelter, but a network of volunteers who open their home to dogs in need. Almost all of the dogs we take in are currently on death row at a shelter. That means we can only take in as many dogs as we have space for in our foster homes. The grim reality is that every week, dogs and puppies are put to death because we do not have enough openings. Your dog is in a safe environment and is not in jeopardy of losing his life. Not only will Outside Adoptions give you the opportunity to find a new home for your dog, but also give another dog a chance to find safety in a foster home.

To get started, fill out the form below with all the required information. After we receive the information, we will gladly post it online for you. We will also email you helpful information on screening potential adopters for your pet.

If you have questions at any point during the process, please give us a call at 708-528-1451 and speak with Kelly Janulis, President of Rover Rescue.


Outside Adoption Form

A dog’s online bio and photo are what tell potential adopters if a dog could be a good fit for them. Many adopters will say something about a photo or a bio caught their attention and they felt a connection with a certain animal that led them to adopt. It is very important to have clear, in-focus pictures and a detailed bio for each adoptable dog so they have the best chance of getting adopted.

Bio Template

Note: You may not have all of this information. Use what you have.

NAME is a APPROXIMATE AGE BREED/MIX. S/he is XX pounds and WILL/WILL NOT grow any more. HOW THE ANIMAL CAME TO THE SHELTER/RESCUE. S/he is TEMPERAMENT. His/her favorite activities are: FETCH, GOING FOR A WALK, SLEEPING ON THE COUCH ETC. ANY SPECIAL NEEDS OR TRAINING THAT SHOULD BE DONE. S/he is GOOD/NOT GOOD with men, women, kids, dogs and cats. S/he is HOUSETRAINED/NOT HOUSETRAINED, CRATE-TRAINED/NOT CRATE-TRAINED. S/he is HEARTWORM STATUS, SPAYED/NEUTERED, and VACCINE STATUS. Her/his adoption fee is $XXX. For more info, CONTACT NAME AND PHONE.

Example:

Amos is a 7-month-old Border Collie/Great Pyrenees mix. He is already 60 pounds so he is going to be a big boy when fully grown! Due to his owner’s health problems, he was surrendered to a shelter. Amos is very timid around new people and new situations. But once he gets comfortable, which took a few days in his foster home, he is a loving, sweet, affectionate boy. He is very smart; he knows “sit,” “shake,” and “down.” He will need a family that will spend the time to help him gain confidence. He loves other dogs and is good with cats. A home without small children would be best, as he gets nervous about all the running and yelling! Amos is housebroken and crate trained. He is neutered and up-to-date on all his shots. His adoption fee is $175. If you have questions about Amos or would like to meet him, call his foster mom Leslie at XXX-XXX-XXXX.

Photo Tips

  1. Natural light is always best. If you can take pictures of the dog outside, do so. If you are taking pictures inside, avoid using a flash. This will usually result in bright “green eye,” the human equivalent of “red eye.” You want people to be able to see the dog’s cute eyes!
  2. Take at least one close-up face shot and one full-body shot so people understand how big or small the dog is. If possible, get down and take pictures from the dog’s level.
  3. Use uncluttered, solid-color, texture-free backgrounds. You want the main focus of the picture to be the dog.
  4. No Photoshop or Picnik “special effects” like extra borders or the dog’s name written on it. It distracts from the focus of the picture.
  5. If possible, get a picture of the dog looking “happy.” A “smile” goes a long way. One way to do this is to take pictures after a walk or exercise when the dog is panting!
  6. If using a cellphone, do not take a vertical picture. Make sure your phone is long ways from left-right.